Monday, October 23, 2017

What Is ROAD RAGE?

What IS Road Rage?

There is no true definition for it. It's more of a term used to characterize the attitude exhibited when a motorist loses their temper as a reaction to a traffic incident. The incident can be something as slight as a person moving into their lane or driving slowly in the fast lane.

Road rage is more typical of aggressive drivers. These drivers  tend to drive faster and change lanes more often. They want to be the first one off the line at the traffic light and want the  fast lane to themselves.

Car-Lotta Credit and Car Sales reminds you that when another driver gets your ire up....

                                   Think FIDO  : Forget It And Drive ON 

Monday, October 16, 2017

Do You Know What You Should NEVER Do ?

You probably rely on your vehicle  every day to get you where you need to go. How well can your car rely on you?

                There are some things you should never do to it.



                                            Several  things to never do to your car

 Put off the recommended maintenance. There’s a reason the car manufacturer gives you that little book when you buy a car. It contains important maintenance guidelines for the age and mileage of your car. By following what it says, you can keep your car running smoothly and safely—and save on having to pay for big repairs later on.

     Ignore any warning lights. Most cars come with a check engine light and other warning lights. If any warning light goes off, it’s time to take your car to a qualified mechanic ASAP.

   Never change the air filter. A fresh air filter keeps your engine running smoothly and improves your car’s fuel efficiency. Most manufacturers suggest you replace your filter every 12,000 to 15,000 miles.

    Never check your tires’ air levels. Not having the right tire pressure makes for unsafe driving and reduced fuel efficiency. Most vehicles list tire pressure requirements on the driver side door post so you know how much air to give your tires.

    Have an unqualified person work on your car. Take the time to find a qualified car mechanic. (Keep in mind that you could qualify as “unqualified” if a repair is beyond your skill level.)

    Rev the engine during the winter. Doing this doesn’t warm up the car—in fact, it can cause damage since the oil hasn’t yet worked its way through the engine.

      Leave keys in the ignition of an unattended car. This is one of the easiest ways to tempt car thieves—especially during the winter.

    Run your gas tank down to empty. Doing so cuts the life of the fuel pump—and puts you at risk of running out before you get to a station.

    Rarely wash your car. A thorough wash helps preserve the exterior of your car. That can ultimately help your car retain its resale value. A good wash is especially important during winter, when road salt does a number on cars. -


                             Car-Lotta Car Sales wants to know if you are  guilty of any of these?

Monday, October 9, 2017

Are You Ready For Fall Car Care Month?

                     October is Fall Car Care Month.

          

 Why not take a little time to be car care aware and make sure your vehicle is ready for the harsh winter weather ahead? Taking a few simple steps now can save you the headaches and cost of an emergency breakdown later.

 Whether you do it yourself or take your car to a professional service technician,  Car-Lotta Car Sales recommends five proactive steps to make sure your car is ready for winter driving.
 
1.    Battery – Keep the battery connections clean, tight and corrosion-free. Cold weather is hard on batteries, so it’s wise to check the battery and charging system. Because batteries don’t always give warning signs before they fail, it is advisable to replace batteries that are more than three years old.  
 
2.  Heater, Defrosters and Wiper Blades – Check that the heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system are working properly as heating and cooling performance is critical for interior comfort and for safety reasons, such as defrosting. Fall is also a great time to check your air filter. Wiper blades that are torn, cracked or don’t properly clean your windshield should be replaced. As a general rule, wiper blades should be replaced every six months. When changing the blades, be sure to also check the fluid level in the windshield washer reservoir.
 
3.    Tires – Check the tires, including the tire pressure and tread depth. Uneven wear indicates a need for wheel alignment. Tires should also be checked for bulges and bald spots. If snow and ice are a problem in your area, consider special tires designed to grip slick roads. During winter, tire pressure should be checked weekly as tires lose pressure when temperatures drop
 
4.    Brakes – Have the brake system checked, including brake linings, rotors and drums. Brakes are critical to vehicle safety and particularly important when driving on icy or snow-covered roads.
 
 
Car-Lotta Credit and Car Sales  reminds you that getting  your vehicle ready for winter while temperatures are still mild is a proactive approach to preventive maintenance that helps ensure safety, reliability and fewer unexpected repairs when severe winter weather strikes.

Monday, October 2, 2017

What Makes Car-Lotta Different?

Here are a few differences between CarLotta Credit and other car dealerships....

* We know and assume that you have credit issues when you stop by, call or email us. We great you with a smile and a hearty handshake and appreciate your business. We understand that good people can and do have credit problems. At some dealerships, when you tell them you have credit issues, they may not be very happy about it or helpful.  

* Nothing you tell us is going to surprise us, or embarress you. For over 24 years we have helped people just like you. Anything you have to tell us, will be handled professionally and held in confidence. Selling and financing cars to people with credit issues is our only business, this is what we do.

* Most dealerships are trying to make as much money as possible on every customer they sell...at CarLotta Credit our #1 goal is to make sure the car is affordable to you and fits in your budget. We want you to be able to afford your payments and pay your loan. Its better for you, and us.

* We report your on time payments to the credit bureaus on a regular basis, this can improve your credit score over time. Most other dealers do not do this.

Most of our payments are set as weekly. This helps you judge your budget and stay current with your payments.

This is just a few of the things that make us different. Stop in, call, or email us and let us actually show you!
 

 CarLotta, www.carlottacredit.com

Monday, September 25, 2017

Has Your Vehicle Been In A Flood?

 
Floods have drenched much of the United States  recently.   Unfortunately, flood-damaged vehicles can be hard to spot. Knowing the signs can help.
Here are a few ways to determine if a used car is a clean machine or a juicy lemon.
 
The quickest way to sniff out whether or not a car has flood damage is to literally sniff it. It's  difficult to completely rid a flood-damaged car of its moldy aroma, and mildew formation is a sure sign that the car was exposed to significant amounts of water. This unpleasant smell is a helpful clue for prospective buyers. If you smell the mold right away, you're probably looking at a flood-damaged car. If you aren't quite sure, however, close the windows and doors, sit inside, and give it a good long sniff.
Along with your sense of smell, your sense of touch is important to sensing moisture in a used car. Water from flooding tends to collect in locations even the dealer may miss.
Run your hands along the carpet and pat it in different spots to try to locate moisture. If you're able, peel back the carpet to see if you can feel moisture between the carpet and the car body. You may also see other signs of water damage, such as rust, by looking under the carpet.
Be sure to open the trunk and feel around the carpet there. Take out the spare tire and feel the material underneath. This is a location where water tends to collect, and it can be missed during even the most thorough of preparations for the lot.
Corrosion is a common affliction in flood-damaged cars. The damage you see today isn't the only ramification of rust: Corrosion continues to eat away at materials long after the car is dry.
Rust and corrosion are often visible. Look for signs of corrosion on metals both inside and out. If you see rust on screws, door hinges, hood springs, trunk latches or brackets under the dashboard, for example, you know those metals had significant contact with water.
Open the doors and look at where the door meets the body. Corrosion often occurs in that corner. In fact, check all four doors, including the bottoms, inside and out.
Another clue is the quality of the carpet. If the vehicle is 10 years old but the carpet looks new, be suspicious. If the upholstery doesn't appear to match, with sections that are a different color, faded, newer or with patterns that don't line up, then someone may have removed water-stained patches. Loose carpet also requires further scrutiny.
While a car is sitting (or floating) in a flood, the water carries in all manner of debris, such as grass, dirt, sand and silt. When the water level recedes, the water itself may be gone, but much of the debris remains. It's difficult for someone cleaning a car to remove all of it.
When examining a used car, you'll want to look in the places where mud and grass may remain after a flood. These include the following areas:
  • inside and under the glove compartment
  • engine crevices
  • the trunk
  • under the spare tire
  • under the dashboard
  • below seats and in seating tracks
  • in wheel wells
Even a used car is an investment, and you don't want to buy a damaged car that will cost you tons of money in the long run. If after your own inspection you still aren't sure the car is completely dry, hire an expert.
 
 
 

Monday, September 18, 2017

Do You Have A PA Road Concern??




Would you like to report a concern on state-owned road conditions, construction projects, signs or signals, speed limits, or damage to personal property? Please use the following link https://www.dot.state.pa.us/Internet/web.nsf/contactUsCCC?OpenForm  to let PennDot know.

Car-Lotta wants to remind you - We care!







Monday, September 11, 2017

Do You Want Your Children To Do Better In School?

School has started back up. CarLotta Credit and Car Sales thought these 5 ways to help your child do better in school could be very helpful. As a parent, after working a hard and long day yourself...it is easy to forget about your children's needs sometimes...

1) Listen. Listen, really listen without tv or other distractions, to what they tell you about their day. How do you feel when are trying to tell someone you care about, how your day went and they just "yes" you to death and watch tv? You can find out so much about your child just from this step. Are they feeling bullied? Are they happy with their teachers? Is the bus ride okay? Do they need help with their homework?

2) Read To Your Kids. When they are young, read to them. When they are older, read with them and encourage them to read on their own. If you feel books are too expensive to buy, there is always the library. The type of book or subject is less important then the actually reading. Set aside limited times for tv, video games and computer. This will give time for reading. How about trading 1 hour of tv for each 1/2 hour reading?

3) If they need help with their schoolwork, give it to them. If you do not feel qualified to help them with 7th grade math for example, ask around. You'd be surprised how many adults, and older kids, are good at school work...and are willing to help for free. You just have to ask. What help and support are available after school or in school?

4) Look at your child's homework and read their reports and papers. Give encouragement, maybe fix a spelling error or two and just show that you care. It is not about you helping them get an "A". It is about you caring about what they are working on and spending their entire day worrying about.

5) BE POSITIVE. It can be very difficult after a long day, but reward their effort with encouragement. How hard do you work if someone is on your case and negative every day?  How about hiding a funny card or note in one of their books or tablets to bring a smile during a hectic day, or before a test? The small things do help.

 Car-Lotta Reminds you ..... If you love them...tell them and show them every day.